Jun 022015
 

Here is a quick line of code you can throw in to your existing scripts if you want to do some validation based on the type of vcenter.
As more companies are moving to the vCenter appliance, MS Windows issues go away.   Until that time, it’s good to alert on disk space and CPU usage for the Windows vCenter.

The quick one-liner to check the vCenter OS:
if(($global:DefaultVIServer | %{$_.extensiondata.content.about.ostype}) -match “win”){ $windows}else{$Linux}

Here is a Windows vCenter “CPU and Disk space” check script:

$vcenter = “vcenter.pcli.me”
$localWindowsAccountUser = “user001″
$localWindowsAccountPass = “test”
## if you want to use a domain account then edit the “$pcstring” var below

Connect-VIServer $vcenter

if(($global:DefaultVIServer | %{$_.extensiondata.content.about.ostype}) -match “win”){
$report=@()
$pcstring = $vcenter+”\”+$localWindowsAccountUser
$Credential = New-Object -TypeName System.Management.Automation.PSCredential -ArgumentList $pcstring,(ConvertTo-SecureString -String $localWindowsAccountPass -AsPlainText -Force)
$temp = get-WmiObject win32_logicaldisk -Computername $vcenter -credential $Credential
foreach($b in ($temp | where {$_.drivetype -eq “3″})){
$reportrow = “” | select VMname, DriveLetter, VolumeName,CapacityGB, FreespaceGB,percentFree
$reportrow.vmname = $vcenter
$reportrow.driveletter = $b.DeviceID
$reportrow.VolumeName = $b.VolumeName
$reportrow.capacityGB = “{0:N3}” -f ($b.Size / 1073741824)
$reportrow.freespaceGB = “{0:N3}” -f ($b.FreeSpace / 1073741824)
$reportrow.percentfree = [System.Math]::floor(($b.FreeSpace / $b.Size)*100)
$report += $reportrow
}
$cpucheck = get-WmiObject win32_processor  -Computername $vcenter -credential $Credential | Measure-Object -property LoadPercentage -Average | Select Average
if(([int]($cpucheck.average)) -ge 90){
$smtpServer = “smtp.pcli.me”
$msg = new-object Net.Mail.MailMessage
$smtp = new-object Net.Mail.SmtpClient($smtpServer)
$msg.From = “Script@pcli.me”
$msg.To.Add(“Team@pcli.me”)
$sub = “vCenter HIGH CPU usage found for “+$vcenter
$msg.subject = $sub
$msg.Body = “”
$smtp.Send($msg)
}}
Disconnect-VIServer -Server $global:DefaultVIServers -Force -confirm:$False

Oct 292014
 

#The following is a good starting template if you have a software suite that uses web based rest APIs.
#** Note,  using Powershell version 4 is highly recommended if the API requires HTTPS and/or uses Self Signed Certs.
# Be sure to edit the user,password and URL below.

# This single line helps get around Cert issues that can prevent you from connecting to the server.  Only use this line if you have connectivity or SSL issues.
[System.Net.ServicePointManager]::ServerCertificateValidationCallback = { $true }

#The Vars and code:
$User = “testUsername”
$PWord = ConvertTo-SecureString –String “testPassword” –AsPlainText -Force
$Cred = New-Object –TypeName System.Management.Automation.PSCredential –ArgumentList $User, $PWord

$wc = New-Object System.Net.WebClient
$wc.Headers.Add(“Authorization”, “Basic $( [System.Convert]::ToBase64String([System.Text.Encoding]::UTF8.GetBytes(“$($Cred.UserName.TrimStart(‘\’)):$($Cred.GetNetworkCredential().Password)”)) )”)
$temp = $wc.DownloadString(“https://TheApiServer.com/api/”)
$temp

#From here you can use the $temp var to dig further into the API and then format what output you want.   You can review one of my older posts if you need help creating a report for easy exporting. If the API posts back something usable you can just use one of the many powershell Export- functions.